The Complete Guide to Successful Landing Pages [Infographic]

By | Google+ , October 23rd, 2012 in Landing Pages | 6 comments

The design and layout of a landing page is discussed in point #1 below.

What? Wait a minute. I’m writing about landing pages? I AM a landing page. Try clicking me. If I were a car, I would be a convertible.

Ok, with my puns out of the way, we can move onto the serious stuff – how to create a successful landing page, and I’ll use an infographic (courtesy of Pardot) to show you how.

Below, the graphic covers 4 essential parts of the process you need to master in order to build a landing page that converts:

  1. Design & Layout: this part refers to the image on the right.
    • A – Keep the branding and styles consistent with the experience people will receive after the click (if they are visiting your website for example).
    • B – A strong value proposition that communicates immediately what you are offering and how it can benefit your visitor.
    • C – Simple and easy to complete forms with a strong/descriptive call-to-action.
    • D – No navigation! Those nasty page leaks have no business on a landing page.
  2. Form Essentials: Only ask for the essential information to limit the number of fields (lowering the barrier to conversion), and collect an email so that you can keep the conversation going.
  3. Providing Value: Three basic rules here; make your page relevant (are you appealing to your target audience?), valuable (is there a direct benefit, like a reward or special offer?), and timely (is your page being presented at the right stage of the sales cycle to nudge your prospect further down the funnel?).
  4. Analyze & Revise: Set goals, so that your landing page has a purpose. This helps you to measure the success of that goal (a conversion) and move into a revision (optimization) phase.

Many people think that landing pages are simple, and this is quite a simplistic look at how they should be created. But the reality is that there’s much more to a successful landing page, and that includes understanding your target market, matching your upstream ads, and optimizing the page to get the biggest conversion lift possible.

For a deeper look into where landing pages fit in the conversion funnel, and which elements should be included on your page, read “The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program“.

Enjoy the infographic.

complete-guide-to-landing-pages-560

Tweetables

You can change what gets tweeted before it goes out, so don’t be afraid to click.

  • You only have a few seconds to capture visitor attention so optimized landing pages make a big difference
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  • Your CTA and value proposition should smack visitors in the face with obviousness
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  • Forms should be simple, easy to complete, and should be optimized to reduce the barrier to entry
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– Oli Gardner


About The Author

Photo of Oli Gardner

Co-Founder of Unbounce. Oli has seen more landing pages than anyone on the planet. He is an opinionated writer and international speaker on Conversion Centered Design. You should follow Oli on Twitter
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Comments

  1. Oli, as ever outstanding content from you! There’s some surprising data on form length. We all expect longer to = lower conversion rates, but in fact for high value content, longer can actually increase conversion. Visitors estimate that the value of the offer must be high and exceed the cost of inputting details in the longer form. More details http://bit.ly/LPDesign

  2. […] on unbounce.com Share this:StumbleUponDiggRedditLike this:LikeBe the first to like this. This entry was posted in […]

  3. Mth says:

    Great tips and breakdown of all the elements involved. Love the infographic, thanks for sharing.

  4. […] / Resources 1  – 101 Landing Page Optimization Tips [Article] 2  – The Complete Guide to Successful Landing Pages [Infographic] 3  – Double B2B Landing Page Conversions [eBook] 4  – Before & After: The Optimization of a […]

  5. Oli great article. You are spot on about forms. We only require name and email address the rest is optional.

  6. […] this from Unbounce or this from Kissmetrics… I am not sure which is […]