The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program [Infographic]

As with that other program, the first and most critical step is admitting you actually have a problem. So go ahead. Shout it out loud so your coworkers can hear:

“My name is Earl. My conversion rate sucks, and I can’t stop sending expensive PPC traffic to my homepage.”

Feel better? You should.

You just passed the “unofficial” first test of landing page rehab, and now you’re ready to take 12 little steps that’ll lift you from that river in Egypt (denial?!?) to a higher place on the conversion charts. This is the intervention your landing pages have been crying out for, so take a deep breath… and let’s get started.

Study the 12-step infographic to see where each step in the program should be applied to the conversion funnel.

Infographic for the 12-step landing page rehab program
Click the image for a full-size view

View Full size version | Download a poster sized version (24″x13″)

Measuring Your Progress – The Conversion Scorecard

Before we begin, we need a quick breathalyzer test to get some baseline metrics in place and measure how effective your treatment program is. The conversion scorecard can be used whether you’re using a standalone landing page for your marketing campaigns or sending traffic directly to a page on your website (homepage, shopping cart or registration page) – although it is geared slightly more towards the standalone variety.

Conversion scorecard

(Click to view or print the full size graphic with the complete set of 20 questions on it.)

Scoring your page

Answer each of the 20 questions as honestly as you can and tally the number of “Yes” responses to arrive at your score. The goal is simply to get a ballpark sense of how good your page is. Then take all of the “No” responses and create a “To Do List” of things to improve on your page. You’ll find some guidance and tips for making these improvements as you follow the 12-step program below.

Remember that after you leave the rehab clinic and have made some positive changes to your conversion funnel, you should revisit the scorecard to measure your improvements.

View and print out the full sized Conversion Scorecard

STEP 1 – Use a Separate Landing Page for each Inbound Traffic Source

The principles of inbound marketing are founded on facilitating multiple streams of traffic. Examples include PPC, email, banner ads and social media. There are two key reasons why you should be using a separate landing page for each source:

  • Each inbound medium has it’s only unique style and limitations. Using separate pages allows you to sync up the visual and tonal qualities with the source. Email for instance can contain a lot more information that a tweet, so the amount of extra information your landing page needs to communicate is inherently different. Imagine also that one of your inbound streams suddenly requires a different offer (perhaps a 20% discount for an affiliate) – with only one page you would have to show this change to all inbound sources.
  • With measurement comes accountability. With separate funnel flows, you can measure the effectiveness of each inbound stream and focus your efforts on the one(s) that convert the best.

Doctors Orders

Start thinking of each inbound source as it’s own mini campaign. You want to have multiple rivers bringing boats to your port (rather than many tributaries feeding one river). Print out the ads for each inbound source (PPC, email, banners, social media) and spend time observing their differences – size, tone, language and visual weight. This will help you design appropriate landing pages.

STEP 2 – A/B Test Your Landing Pages

A/B testing is the process of splitting your traffic between a series of pages to see which performs the best. Anne Holland’s WhichTestWon.com is a fun site that shows examples of A/B tests and lets you pick which version you think would produce the highest conversion rate.

On a corporate level, testing helps to remove conjecture and subjective argument from the boardroom and is a great way of understanding your customers (which messaging and design do they respond to best). It should be done as an iterative process – think evolution vs. revolution.

FACT: Your landing page can always be better. Just like a plant, it needs ongoing attention for best results.

Doctors Orders

Take the plunge and get a tool set up so you are at least able to start testing your landing pages. Then the fun part of trying new ideas and experimenting can come.

TIP: You can open a free Unbounce account here and start creating and A/B testing pages in minutes.

STEP 3 – Match Your Landing Page Message to the Upstream Ad

If the primary headline of your landing page doesn’t match the copy on your ad you’ll be getting a lot of action on your browser’s back button. As an example, consider the following:

Bad message match

Ad: Get 20% off a MacBook Pro
Landing page message: Welcome to Bobby’s Computer Store

Good message match

Ad: Get 20% off a MacBook Pro
Landing page message: Get 20% off a Macbook Pro at Bobby’s Computer Store

Seems obvious right? The problem is that most inbound traffic gets sent to company homepages where the messaging is necessarily generic. Using a targeted standalone landing page is key to reinforcing the customer’s belief that they made a “good click”. You will also get a better quality score and thus a lower cost-per-click from Google AdWords if your message match is strong (this extends to the entire content on the page which should be congruent with the headline message).

Bonus tip: If you are driving social media traffic, you can enhance the “social message match” by including an appropriate social icon on your landing page to further reinforce the connection between the source and destination.

Doctors Orders

Learning to construct your campaigns in the right order can help you ensure good message match. Start with a concept based on communicating your product/service/offer to your target market. Come up with your promotional headline and landing page content, then work on a series of ads that closely match the headline. If you do it the other way round (ad first), you are forced into building from what might be the wrong foundation.

STEP 4 – Context of Use

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. A better picture is one where your product or service is shown being used in context. Salespeople will tell you to sell the fire, not the fire extinguisher – the point being that you need to illustrate the need in order to develop desire for the solution.

Effective landing pages use photography and video to provide evidence of how your product or service solves a real problem.

A statement like “Our vacuum cleaner is so powerful it can suck up a bag of nails” beside a stock photo of the product against a white background is far less likely to convert than a video showing (and letting you hear) the vacuum cleaner actually doing the job. An example using photography could show a fold-up ladder in two states. Being tucked into a small cupboard by it’s owner, and then extended to show the owner reaching onto high shelves to retrieve something. Simply showing it in it’s intended context of use will improve your sales.

Would you really have bought a ShamWow without seeing it in action?

Doctors Orders

Take your product or service and actually use it for real (you’d be surprised how many people haven’t even used the item they’re selling). This will help you to understand and visualize how it should be presented in your photography and videos. If it’s an online tool, try observing someone else using it.

STEP 5 – Use Videos to Increase Engagement & Conversions

According to a study by eyeviewdigital.com, the use of video can increase your conversions rates by as much as 80%. By providing users with a passive engagement mechanism you can keep them on your page longer allowing your brand message to seep into their subconscious.

Warning: don’t just throw up a poorly animated Powerpoint presentation – nobody will watch it.

If you are peddling a physical product, show people using it as mentioned in step 4. If it’s an online tool, provide a demo of the primary features while narrating the benefits of it’s use (don’t show every step, make it a highlight reel). If you offer a service, put yourself front and center and communicate directly with your viewers. Make eye contact for maximum engagement and make use of directional cues to guide them to your intended conversion goal. Great videos do this by having the host look and point outside the frame towards other elements on the page – bringing the whole page into the experience.

Usability best practices say to never auto play a video as the audio shock can make people hit the back button immediately, especially if they are in a sound sensitive environment – like most offices. However, this is something you should test on your visitors. My advice if you want to start the video automatically would be to at least allow a shot delay before it starts, and make the controls very obvious in case someone wants to mute or pause the video.

Doctors Orders

If you don’t use video yet, plan to start soon. For online product demos, try recording a screencast using software like Jing. It’s really simple and cost effective. Once you get a feel for it you can upgrade to more elaborate tools with stronger editing and post-production features. Audio is very important – write a script before you record so you’re not bumbling your way through and try to use an external mic for better quality.

STEP 6 – Use Directional Cues to Lead the Way

Imagine an airport without the expertly placed wayfinding signs and maps – it would be chaos. If you’ve visited the emergency room at a hospital, you might be familiar with the colored lines they paint on the floor to take you to different departments – follow the yellow brick road. These are examples of directional cues, which can be broken down into explicit and implicit (both of those were explicit).

Directional cues are used on landing pages to guide the visitor to your call to action. Here are some examples of ways to do this:

  • Graphical arrows: Take a look at the header area of the lead gen form on this landing page template. When you add a lead gen form to your page, the call to action button is often pushed below the fold. Here, the arrow lets you know that the point of interaction can be found directly below that area.
  • Whitespace: Don’t cramp the style of your CTA. Resist the temptation to fill in every pixel of your page, instead give your buttons plenty of room to breathe.
  • Color: Classic colors for buttons include blue (link color) and orange. At the end of the day, the most important thing is that it stands out clearly from the rest of the page (e.g. don’t make your button blue if your page has a blue background).
  • Contrast: This is essentially the same as the point about color (but thinking in terms of black and white or tonal range).
  • Eye direction: It’s been shown that when using photos of people (or animals), that you can improve conversion by having them look at your intended call to action. It makes sense. If you see someone looking up at the sky while you’re walking down the street, the chances are you’ll follow their gaze in case you’re missing something important.
  • Interruption: Surprise is an excellent way to get someone’s attention. Breaking established design boundaries gives reason to pause and observe. Boo!
  • Encapsulation: Think of binoculars or the viewfinder on a camera and how they focus your vision. You can construct similar experiences using shapes and contrast. Think about archways, holes and windows for inspiration.
  • Pathways: Roads or the earlier example from the hospital floor are examples of pathways. You can use background design elements (lines with arrows generally) to walk someone round your page in the order you prefer.

For a more exhaustive study of the effects of directional cues, I wrote a post that uses photography to illustrate each of the methods above: Designing for Conversion – 8 Visual Design Techniques to Focus Attention on Your Landing Pages.

Doctors Orders

Learn to point. It might be considered rude in some cultures, but in conversionland it’s actively encouraged. Make the intended action of your page as obvious as possible – subtlety is for shy folks. Add at least one directional cue to an existing landing page. If your design is quite restrictive, you can try breaking the visual boundaries by placing an arrow outside of the page edge, pointing in towards your CTA – this disruptive visual tactic can be very effective at directing eyeballs.

STEP 7 – Find the Optimal Balance of Data vs. Conversion Rate

Lead generation is about two things – the size of the barrier (how long, personal or complicated the form is) and the size of the prize (what you are giving away in return for the data). If these are out of proportion you risk losing customers.

It’s a delicate balance to achieve: make the form too long and people walk away from the perceived effort, make the questions off-topic or too personal and you wind up with false data. Conversely, if the form is too short you can skew your leads towards those just seeking a freebie instead of real, determined and relevant customers. It can also result in you not being able to qualify your leads accurately.

The other factor that complicates all of this is the giveaway you are offering. If your eBook, coupon or webinar isn’t good enough to warrant the information you are asking for folks will bounce. For a webinar registration keep the info to a bare minimum – name, email and maybe company and role if it’s B2B. If you’re giving away an eBook, it needs to be one of two things: significant in size or significant in it’s exclusive data content. Above all, quality is what counts. You can tease people into completing your form to get your super awesome whitepaper, but if it turns out to be smoke and mirrors, you’ll have a lead that’s disappointed and likely to unsubscribe immediately.

Doctors Orders

This is where A/B testing becomes really useful. Set up multiple versions of your form and test them to find where the balance lies. Is it acceptable to remove a few questions in order to get more leads? Does your conversion rate even get affected by the addition of extra questions. Only testing with your target audience can answer these questions.

STEP 8 – Be Honest About Your Writing & Edit Ruthlessly

Never publish the first thing you write. Unless you are in the business of reportage poetry (I may have just made that name up). Campaigns and their associated messaging need to be refined over time through testing but also through editing. Steve Krug (author of the classic usability book “Don’t Make Me Think”) made the best observation on the subject I’ve heard: delete 50% of your page content, then throw away half of what’s left.

Doctors Orders

Try removing 2 sentences from the main body of copy on your landing page. I bet it won’t hurt as much as you think. If you have 5 bullet points, try going with the 3 most important ones. Keep deleting extraneous words and redundant phrases until your copy is as tight as a Scotsman being asked to pay a bar tab. Like everything you change on your pages, you should make your edits on a duplicate page and run an A/B test to verify if it produces higher conversions.

STEP 9 – Make it Easy to Share

The impulse to share content can be fleeting, so don’t make people work for it. While not applicable to all landing pages, those with special offers or special content (perhaps a great video) – should have a simple way for people to spread the word for you.

There are two great ways to make this work:

  1. Use Twitter @Anywhere to add widgets that allow people to tweet your offer. Make it part of the contest rules that they follow you and tweet your message in exchange for entry into the contest (free marketing).
  2. Place sharing widgets such as retweet buttons on your confirmation pages (see step 12 for more on this)

Doctors Orders

Design for your audience. If you’re driving Twitter traffic, retweet buttons are familiar and easy to use. The beauty of Twitter @Anywhere components is that they utilize Ajax style interaction and don’t take you away from the page. Similarly if you are funneling Facebook traffic, add a “Like” button to the page. Most Facebook’ers are logged in all the time and the button will add your landing page into their timeline with a single click.

STEP 10 – Leverage Social Proof & Trust Devices

Testimonials work, if they’re real. Avoid stock photos and scripted hyperbole as most people can spot a fake testimonial a mile away. Try a mixture of testimonials that describe how your product or service has benefited someone’s experience, coupled with the enthusiastic style that say “you guys rule!”. I’d only use the latter from a well known industry expert or celebrity.

To modernize your landing pages, illustrate social proof by showing your standing in a relevant social network. There are many widgets available that can show how many people like or follow you. Social capital and the herd mentality of network participants can help convince prospects to become customers.

Doctors Orders

Ask 10 of your customers for a fresh testimonial and add the best to your landing page. Remember to state your usage intentions and ask for a photo if possible. If you have a decent social network presence, try adding a live feed widget based on a specific phrase or #hashtag search to show who and how people are interacting with your brand.

STEP 11 – One Page, One Purpose

Imagine a web page that exhibits the same tendencies as a kid with ADD. If your content can’t decide on one thing to do at a time, then your visitors certainly won’t want to take the time to figure it out.

The principal of congruence states that each element on your page should support a single focused objective. A good way of looking at this is to imagine a series of arrows all pointing to the center of a circle where there is a big button (your CTA). Each arrow represents a piece of content on your landing page, and you need to ensure that they are all in conceptual alignment.

Contrast this to those same arrows all pointing in different directions (conceptually).

Congruence

To maintain focus, don’t talk about other products or services – you can use a different landing page and ad source for those. An exception to this is on an ecommerce product page that provides the ability to add extra products to the cart as add-add-on’s to your main conversion goal.

Doctors Orders

Try this exercise. Explain the purpose of your campaign to a colleague. Now read the content of your landing page out loud and ask her to stop you if you veer away from the central purpose as previously stated. If this happens, remove the offending content and start over. You will notice a lot more about your writing style by saying it out loud. For visual elements, try writing the goal of your campaign on a piece of paper, then print and cut out the images from your landing page and place them around the goal. Remove or replace any that don’t seem to be in total agreement with this goal.

STEP 12 – Post-Conversion Marketing

Post-conversion marketing is one of the most overlooked stages of the conversion funnel. The confirmation page from your lead gen form, ecommerce checkout, or registration form is the perfect place to start capitalizing on the positive mood of a newly qualified customer.

In the case of lead gen, you achieved the conversion goal of your lead gen page and you are probably going to start sending your new lead a series of email messages to encourage them to step up to the next level. Note that it can take up to 6 or 7 contact incidents to make this happen (according to email provider Constant Contact).

To increase your engagement potential, try to add your leads to other channels in your sphere of marketing influence (from your confirmation page). This amplifies the reach of your messages and can be the difference between being heard and being forgotten.

Some common examples include:

  • Follow us on Twitter (so they see regular updates)
  • Like us on Facebook (so they see updates and become part of your community)
  • Download our free eBook (to keep your brand in front of them and increase your “thought leadership” score
  • Visit this page (send them to other content they may find interesting)
  • Share this with your friends/colleagues (leverage their network)
  • Bookmark us on Delicious

Doctors Orders

Go beyond a simple “Thank you” on your confirmation pages. Start by adding one new link to the page and track how much extra traffic visits that target.

WHAT NOW?

Now you have the tools and advice to break those bad conversion habits and rehabilitate your struggling marketing funnel. Did you do the scorecard exercise? Are you on the epic end of the scale or the “I did like, 19 things wrong!” end of the scale? The scorecard is there to provide you with a “to do list” of conversion improvements. Take every question you answered No to and create a personal task to fix it. Then implement a new A/B test to see how well your new landing page fares.

Share Your Landing Page & Scorecard Score With Us

Show me your landing page and score and see if I agree with your assessment (I’ll run through the checklist too).

Good luck with your rehab, and remember, your landing page can always be better.

– Oli Gardner


About The Author

Photo of Oli Gardner

Oli is Co-Founder & Creative Director at Unbounce. He's seen more landing pages than anyone on the planet. You should follow Oli on Twitter
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Comments

  1. Keith says:

    I'm not sure if most people can see the extreme value and brilliance in the post, but they should. This blog is a gift to business that keeps on giving.

  2. oligardner says:

    Thanks Keith! Very much appreciated.

  3. Alex says:

    Great Post!! Thanks. Would be nice if your score card and Graph where in a more “print friendly” format!! (not black and bitmap) A vector based PDF with a white background would be nice!

  4. oligardner says:

    Thanks Alex.
    Good feedback. I'm hoping to get an interactive version of the scorecard produced at some point too.

  5. [...] – Here are a couple of my favorite posts – 7 Elements of a Winning Landing Page and The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program – the topic that covers the infographic in this [...]

  6. Oli-

    Any opinion on the placement of the tools to enable social sharing? Should those be at the top of the page? The bottom? Both?

    Agree with you that you need to know your audience. Just curious if you have any thoughts on what spots typically get the most engagement.

  7. Oli Gardner says:

    A key thing you want to do is ensure secondary CTAs like this don’t compete with your primary goal.
    As such, it’s a good idea to place them at the end.

    If your traffic source is social media then placement of a related social media icon (twitter bird log etc) can be good at the top of the page to maintain the information scent, but you would leave the sharing interaction to a lesser spot on the page.

    If you page is just about content – perhaps a viral video, then you might want your sharing mechanisms to be the primary goal, in which case they’d be prominent and close to the content in question.

    If you are doing lead gen, then putting this type of thing on the confirmation page is a great tactic as it doesn’t interfere with the main page.

    At the end of the day, if having your page shared is one of your goals, then testing the placement for your audience is the best way to go.

    Hope that helps.
    Cheers
    Oli

  8. Backlinks says:

    IÕve been blogging for quite some time and this is definitely a effective and well written article. I signed up for your newsletter and shared it with my other blogger buddies, so please keep up the informative posts! Good luck on your blog.

  9. seomadness says:

    Hey, The nice article sites just found your site on with yahoo helped me a lot! I really like the info, thank you.

  10. [...] The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program [Infographic] | Unbounce The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program [Infographic] | Unbounce (tags: The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program [Infographic] | Unbounce) [...]

  11. Nice info graphic, Oli. Really sums up the bigger picture of whats going on and what you need to consider when optimising your landing pages.

    I probably wouldn’t say video increases conversion definitively – in my experiences, it’s hurt conversion more often. I think its one of those things that really depends on your market, their connection speeds and really the quality of the video (aka. not some Youtube crap).

    • Oli Gardner says:

      Thanks Robert.

      Yeah, the best thing about trying out video is that it’s one of the classic A/B tests. Which is the best way to find out exactly what you’re talking about – whether or not it’s applicable to your visitor demographic.

      Quality is definitely important – luckily it’s getting cheaper and cheaper to get it done with equipment and some new services out there.

      We’re lucky that our CTO has a great radio voice for doing our videos :)

  12. [...] The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program, an infographic from Unbounce, presents a guided visualization of the conversion funnel and where [...]

  13. Hey. I kinda like this blog and especially the appearance and the theme. I’d like to know where you found it? Or is it yours?

  14. Oli, have you seen test results that prove that long copy turns people off? I’ve heard so many times that long copy converts better because people scan, they don’t read.

    Doesn’t that statement go against conventional sales copy wisdom?

    • Oli Gardner says:

      Hey Scott,
      It’s a really tough one and not something I have stats to hand. What I do know (from what I hear on the grapevine is that this style of page works. But to me it works because it’s tightly matched to the demographic that’s susceptible to the excited hype driven copy that makes people get sucked into the sales pitch.

      So it’s definitely a case by case basis.

      I’m quite in favour of long pages (campl.us) – just not the get-rich-quick sales latter approach that attempts to hypnotize the reader with dreams of grandeur, and promised land riches.

      At the end of the day, what matters is engagement. Short or long, if you can capture the attention of your visitor with honest and useful information you’ll do better.

      But there is a place for everything, sleeze ‘n’ all.

  15. Oli, awesome infographic with some great information. I can confirm from experience that video does increase conversions for sure! I’m also a fan of longer landing pages myself.

  16. The scorecard is such a great tool to analyze your performance in improving your site.. Unfortunately though, it showed that I’ve been missing a lot.lol

  17. Jerry Samuels says:

    I’ve read tons of stuff on landing pages. And I’ve paid handsomely for some of that education. Or spent lots of time for much of the rest of it. But your 12 steps are by far the most useful information I’ve studied on landing pages! Your work should be required reading for anybody who wants to really understand both what to do and how to make landing pages right. In my opinion your work here is the most significant work on landing pages on the internet. Thank you for taking the time to share it with us.

  18. [...] As a basic minimum, hotel websites should be optimized for  search, social, landing pages and on review [...]

  19. Sarah D says:

    Wow this is really one of the best breakdowns of landing page science I’ve read. That A/B testing site is epic too.

  20. Oli, Wonderful job. I cannot believe I missed this when you first published it. Thank you for tweeting it today.

  21. Kevin Getch says:

    Hey Oli,

    I just started using Unbounce and have to say it’s awesome. I’m running some test campaigns over the next few weeks and then going to switch some of our clients as well.

    The 12 Step Rehab is great… Your blog is going to be required reading at our company!

    Have a great day!
    Kevin

    • Oli Gardner says:

      Great to hear Kevin. I hope you have great success with your campaigns – feel free to come back and share your pages and maybe we can get a conversation going about them.

  22. Wow, once again, your graphics and outlines are great. You get straight to the real advice which is why this little guide is golden. Seriously…

    First of all – use a different landing page for each traffic source. Not only does that make perfect sense, but you can also track soooo much easier this way.

    Oh yes – match your landing message with your upstream ad! Great piece of advice if you ask me. One of the biggest reasons that many people get huge bounce rates is because visitors think that they have been taken to some random page and they quickly leave. They want to see that the page they are entering is correlated to the page that they were just on or the ad that they just clicked on. Great point – this is something that I have been trying to tell my PPC clients for years!

  23. [...] Source_ www.unbounce.com Thursday, November 17th, 2011 at 1:29 am Infographics | Marketing | infographic, landing page, marketing Feed Comments Previous [...]

  24. Hey! I was just buzzin’ through this most awesome post again for a quick refresher & thought you might like to know that the link http://raw.glow.com/dms1825/ in Step 5 no longer works as intended. Just sayin’ …

  25. [...] The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program (Infographic) [...]

  26. [...] better. Remember, the first step in addressing a problem is admitting you have one. Then go to Landing Page Rehab for a health [...]

  27. [...] The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab ProgramBadass lesson: If you pay attention to your sponsor (not the one paying for your t-shirts) and follow these twelve steps, you can make a big difference in the performance of your landing pages. [...]

  28. web designer says:

    Thanks for that Oli – can I use that checklist and promote it on my own website (I’ll source it to unbounce of course)? Fantastic article again. Unbounce is my source for landing page info (and also how to write quality articles).

    • Oli Gardner says:

      Absolutely – feel free to use it on your site. And thanks for the kind words. I’m glad you liked the article.

  29. [...] Via unbounce.com Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. This entry was posted in Uncategorized by lsmn364. Bookmark the permalink. [...]

  30. Matthew Egan says:

    It’s funny because so many people like to skip the steps and go straight for the sexy stuff. It’s often the little details that get in our way. I especially like your “One Page, One Purpose” language, I think I’ll probably start using that.

    Thanks for publishing this!

  31. Its one of the greatest rehabs i know. I use the tips from unbounce for more then 6 months and i couldn’t be happier with the results.

  32. Michael Hardenbrook says:

    Hey Oli,

    I’ve been following your posts and I must say this is so implementable from any marketing level, novice to advanced. So much value.

    I’m producing a course with some of the guys at Mixrank and CannedBanners and would love to include Unbounce as the source for creating landing pages.

    If you’d like some more info, what’s the best way I can get that to you?

    Either way, awesome stuff!

    Michael

  33. [...] Converteert jouw landingspagina niet? Of heb gaan bezoekers meteen weg? Stuur je landingspagina dan naar een rehabilteitscursus en volg de volgende stappen uit de Infographic van Unbounce. [...]

  34. Great post and awesome Infographic. Hope you don’t mind me sharing it with others.

  35. Michael says:

    Solid info. I have used the Unbounce templates before, you folks are an authority in landing page academic thinking. We are just getting into the infographic game ourselves.

  36. [...] Conversion → The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program [Infographic] | Unbounce The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program [Infographic] | Unbounce By Ernesto Schmidt-Mumm on September 27, 2011   /   Conversion   / [...]

  37. [...] Landing Page Rehab by Oli Gardner [...]

  38. [...] out how to do that. This is exactly when you need an infographic like that below by Oli Gardner on Unbounce - the 12-step landing page rehab programme. It says all you need in first instance. Print it, keep [...]

  39. [...] further reading I’d start with these 2 blog posts: The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program & 101 Landing Page Optimization [...]

  40. [...] an wonderful infographic by UnBounce is the 12 Step Landing Page Rehab Program. More info on their website if [...]

  41. [...] at ‘Unbounce’, a landing page hosting and testing service used by Click Click Media, is a great checklist for [...]

  42. [...] can be found here) This entry was posted in Direct Digital Marketing and tagged Call to Action, Design, Internet, [...]

  43. Jack Wilson says:

    Hi, my name is Jack and I was a home page ad end user. Since working the 12 steps of Ubounce, I have saved my business from utter failure and gotten my life back again (and trophy wife&kids now that I’m making good money again). I highly recommend that you call Ubounce and get yourself a sponsor and start working the 12 setps to get your business (and life) where it needs to be.

  44. Randy Laub says:

    Oli, I’m embarrassed to say I have not visited your site in a while. Love this 12-step landing page rehab. I would stress to your readers a few points that I never forget. One is to “walk through the page.” Every step needs to logically lead to the next – ad to banner, banner to H1, H1 to body, body to CTA and so forth. Additionally, key to successful conversions are removing barriers to convert – long forms, personal info, and more.

    Thanks for another great post. Love your material!

  45. [...] “One page, one purpose.” ~ Oli Gardner, Unbounce (Landing Page Rehab) [...]

  46. [...] poate fi găsit aici) This entry was posted in Fără categorie. Bookmark the permalink. ← Fa ca Mesajele tale [...]

  47. We followed #12–post-conversion techniques and that got us thinking about how to handle people when they are done filling out our form. It definitely works, we direct people back into the site and we can see from the visitor flow in GA that about 35% of the people click around a bit even AFTER they have already contacted us.

  48. [...] предлагаем ознакомиться вам с переводом статьи Оли Гарднера о 12-шаговой программе оздоровления посадочных [...]

  49. [...] предлагаем ознакомиться вам с переводом статьи Оли Гарднера о 12-шаговой программе оздоровления посадочных [...]

  50. [...] 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program” by Oli Gardner.  You can find his article here:  http://unbounce.com/landing-pages/landing-page-rehab or here:  http://www.seomoz.org/blog/the-12step-landing-page-rehab-program-infographic-10488.  I [...]

  51. Thanks for sharing your thoughts about conversion.
    Regards

  52. [...] 12 pasos para mejorar tu landing page por qué un blog te ayudará a vender con una tienda online The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program [...]

  53. I particularly enjoyed the part about reading your content out loud. I go to so many web sites that seem like they have been written more for the owners enjoyment in hearing themselves sound smart of witty then with the goal of actually getting a potential client to contact them. Do you have a general update to this article Oli?

    • Oli Gardner says:

      Thanks Richard. I don’t have an updated version unfortunately. Maybe an idea for the future.
      Cheers
      Oli

  54. [...] 31 – 54 Conversion Rate Optimization Tips To Improve Your PPC Campaigns [article] 32 – Landing Page Rehab [Interview]  34 – Landing Pages and Twitter [ebook] 35 - Internal Linking Strategies for 2012 and Beyond [...]

  55. Plaban Manna says:

    That’s a good piece of information, Score card is a great tool to track our progress, it have helped me a lot to turn my mistakes in benefits. ;)

  56. Allen Buck says:

    I’m currently not using separate landing pages for each of my PPC campaigns. Perhaps I should switch to this method. My people generally are looking for surgery but I wan them to learn about the surgery first.

  57. Rene Jaso says:

    My web guy needs to get on this. I’m new to all this but I’m trying to familiarize myself with it.

  58. [...] a corresponding landing page that echoes the content in the ad. Please do not use your homepage as the destination url of your [...]

  59. [...] Puedes seguir leyendo el artículo completo en unbounce. [...]

  60. SeatCrunch says:

    Very good information, and still viable today. I’m glad I came across this. I think most people look over step 7.

  61. [...] They tried to make me goto Rehabhttp://unbounce.com/landing-pages/landing-page-rehab/ [...]

  62. Allen Buck says:

    I’ve found that with my clients the better the landing page the better the signups. I now get signups with more complete information and with higher frequencies. I have a condensed form that does not do as well because people prefer to sign up after reading everything.

  63. Mike says:

    Niice stuff folks, this will help me improve my landing pages, thanks a lot.

  64. Ryan Key says:

    Very good advice, landing pages seem to not get properly optimized and many people undervalue their ability to convert.

  65. Darin Persinger says:

    Just a note on “matching ad to landing page”.

    I feel this should always be tested also and not just taken for fact.

    I ran a variant test recently. Started off with 4 different ppc ads to test the click thru rate. 2 ads matched the landing page. One perfectly with headline and body. The other just body. The other 2 ads had nothing to do with the landing page.

    The click thru data turned out interesting to me but the most surprising data point was that the landing page was converting at a lower level with the ads that matched vs the ads that had nothing to do with the page.

    Match the ad to the page makes so much sense it’s easy to accept it has fact all the time. But the reality is test everything. Even that.

  66. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. These are wordpress custom themes.

  67. This is another heads-up post to be remembered. I am doing landing pages but forgot to do some important stuff which should be a must to consider. Thanks!

  68. Ryan Duncan says:

    Awesome post! Conversion rate optimization is the most important aspect of making an SEO, PPC or other advertising campaign work for the client. For beginners in CRO this can look like a lot of work, but I think you outlined it all very clearly. Good luck to all those following these steps!

  69. Chris L says:

    Thank you, just another reason I love unbounce.

  70. Nice post
    While talking about social sharing, I want to add that conversion ratio differs with platforms. I have tested and found Facebook and Stumbleupon traffic have worst conversion rate whereas Linkedin and Pinterest works really well. Even the competition in these platforms is much lower than Facebook and traffic on Facebook is ready to make any purchase whereas Linkedin is a professional social network. Thus intent of visitors matters a lot. Don’t try to grab more and more traffic rather find people with intention to make purchase or ready to subscribe and having some interest in your products.

  71. [...] пройти программу из 12 ступеней. Хотя, вообще-то, такая программа есть. Но чтобы наполнить смыслом этот пост, давайте [...]

  72. [...] пройти программу из 12 ступеней. Хотя, вообще-то, такая программа есть. Но чтобы наполнить смыслом этот пост, давайте [...]

  73. Thank you, just another reason I love unbounce.

  74. You should be a part of a contest for one of the greatest
    sites on the net. I’m going to recommend this web site!

  75. […] 2-Jan-2014 09:27 – The 12-Step Landing Page Rehab Program [Infographic] @unbounce […]